Charter Yachts Turkey

Dufour 325
Bareboats
Sailing Aegean
Greece And Turkey

Sailing Aegean Turkey

Designed by naval architects Umberto Felci and Patrick Roseo for fast coastal cruising,
the Dufour 325 is ideal for sailing Aegean Turkey and among nearby Aegean islands of Greece. Easy to single-hand in any weather, she comes with mainsail tackle on the coach roof, freeing the cockpit for relaxation. With a length of only 32 feet, the Dufour 325 offers an unusual amount of interior space
in which four guests may holiday and charter-sail Greece and Turkey in comfort.

Sailing Aegean Greece

Below Decks

This twenty-first century yacht offers stylish accommodation for up to six guests in two well-appointed cabins sharing a detached bathroom. One cabin is aft of the salon and galley, while the second cabin is forward of the salon. The salon itself could well accommodate a third couple.

Sailing Aegean Turkey

Sailing Aegean Greece

Specifications:

Length: 32.2 ft
Beam: 11.2 ft
Draft: 5.1 ft
Displacement: 10,360 lbs
Sail Area: 470 sq ft
Engine: 19 hp Volvo
Speed: 6 knots
Fuel: 24 gal
Water: 42 gal

Equipment:

Furling Main
Furling Headsail
Bimini Top
Navigation Instrumentation
Autopilot
Electric Windlass
Stereo CD/Cassette System
Tender with Outboard
Charts and Pilot

Sailing Aegean Greece

Sailing Aegean Turkey

Sailing Aegean Greece

Sailing Aegean Turkey

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A Larger Dufour Sailing Aegean Greece and Turkey

A Crewed Yacht Sailing Aegean Greece and Turkey

Sailing Routes

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This page last updated 04/21/2016

Sailing Aegean Greece

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information concerning bareboat charter yachts sailing Aegean Greece and Turkey may be obtained by clicking on the maroon links immediately above. Thank You. You may be searching for a bareboat charter yacht sailing Turkey or Greece. Or you may be searching for a bare boat charter yacht sailing Turkey and Greece. If so, you have come to the right place. These Dufour 325's do their sailing along the coast of Turkey between pine-encircled bays and clear-water coves, between white-sand beaches and rustic villages. They also cruise azure sea lanes between pastel-hued Dodecanese islands of Greece's eastern Aegean. In short, these fast French-built yachts cruise the crossroads of history, combining sun and sport with an awareness of the people and events shaping eastern Mediterranean cultures. Among the Alexanders and Cleopatras influencing the course of eastern Mediterranean history were countless seamen, Alcibiades and Lysander commanding the triremes of ancient Greece, the Barbarossa and Dragut brothers captaining lateen-rigged galliots and fleets of galliots under Barbary and Ottoman flags, and, upon the advent of sailing men-of-war, there were others with quite different skills. Among these was Antonio Correa Montenegro, born in the early 1600's to Cruising Portugalminor nobility during the dynastic union of Spain and Portugal when both countries shared the same king. Not the eldest son, he and another younger son, Antonio Correa de Souza, were destined for the church. Raised on the coast of north-western Portugal with visions of far-flung empire as well as on a diet of Vasco da Gama, Lourenco Marques, Ferdinand Magellan, and other Portuguese sea captains firmly established in history, Montenegro was no differently inclined. He took naturally to the sea. Combining inclination with family wishes, however, both brothers took vows with the seagoing Hospitaller Knights of Jerusalem then also known as the Knights of Malta. Portugal gained its independence from Spain in 1640, and as a Hospitaller Montenegro subsequently took service with Prince Regent Pedro as captain-general of a Portuguese flotilla dispatched to Brazil to rid that country's coast of Dutch and English pirates, as in the following Jacob Loef rendering. The De Utrecht (16 guns) depicted to the right now lies on the bottom in the waters of Salvador da Bahia, Brazil. Montenegro did his job so well that upon return to the Hospitallers he was awarded the Grand Cross, the Order's highest honor. But it was not Montenegro's service in Brazil that attracts our attention but rather his service in the Aegean and along the Mediterranean coast of Turkey, particularly his service during the 1645-1669 war between Venice and the Ottoman Empire over possession of Crete. The ninth year of that war had not begun well for Venice. Her sailing ships had attempted to blockade the Dardanelles Cruising Brazilto inhibit resupply of Ottoman forces besieging Crete's capital city. In this first fleet action of the war the Venetians had been brushed aside by once-and-future Grand Vizier and current Ottoman Fleet Commander Kara Murad Pasha, losing four vessels with one flag officer killed and another captured. During the same month, however, April 1654, four Hospitaller privateers intercepted a 13-ship convoy from Alexandria, Egypt, bound for Crete with provisions, coin, and 5,500 elite janissary reinforcements. Unable to point directly for Crete, the convoy had first been detected between Rhodes and the smaller Greek islands of Kastellorizon and Ayios Yiorgos. That same night the Hospitallers descended on the convoy with lights blazing to suggest a larger force. By then off the Gulf of Macri/Fethiye, the convoy scattered. Three went to the bottom under fire from the two larger privateers each mounting 40 guns. The two smaller privateers, bertones similar in rig and armament to the De Utrecht and commanded by Montenegro and the Chevalier De Bouf, exchanged protracted gunfire with the 54-gun enemy flagship. De Bouf's vessel was dismasted and holed. She drifted away and sank. Montenegro even so brought his bertone alongside the larger ship and boarded. There were six companies of janissaries embarked and the odds must have seemed daunting notwithstanding damage done beforehand. When the fighting ceased, two hundred thirty-three of these Christian conscripts lay down their arms, fewer than half the original number. Taking water, the flagship was driven ashore somewhere in Aguafredda, greater Cold Water Bay adjacent to the Gulf of Fethiye, where she had to be abandoned by her prize crew when an onshore Cruising Aegean Greecesouthwest Libeccio wind came roaring in hours later. The prize crew abandoned ship so hastily that 400,000 piasters were left in the hold. When the storm abated, the prize was nowhere to be seen. Hobbled by battle damage, Montenegro's bertone soon after lost her mainmast at Kekova Roads and was forced to head under a white flag for the same Alexandria whence the Ottoman convoy had come. There Montenegro swapped his 233 captives for the extraordinary sum of 30,000 gold pieces-of-eight, a sum perhaps authorized by Kara Murad, himself a former janissary conscripted, like all janissaries, in his youth. Thus while one treasure may still lie on the seabed of Cold Water Bay, Antonio Correa Montenegro returned to Malta with another. The Venetians meanwhile regained the initiative in the Aegean, and Kara Murad did not reinforce Crete that year. No relief force whatsoever made it to Crete in 1654. That said, the war ended sixteen years later with the Ottomans in possession. Before the end, however, Montenegro was to return to the Aegean. He was there in both 1660 and 1661 as captain of the Hospitaller galley San Giuseppe, patrolling with other Hospitaller galleys among Aegean islands from Kithera to Sifnos to Negroponte to Lesbos and most notably including a landing at Suda Bay, Crete, in the first of those years at the head of 700 Hospitaller troops where with a musket ball in his leg he seized the fortress of Santa Veneranda then in Ottoman hands. In 1677 Montenegro was elected General of the Hospitaller Galley Squadron, and for the next two years pursued Ottoman satraps infesting the Barbary Coast. He was succeeded in command of the galley squadron in 1679 by his brother Antonio Correa de Souza. Why not trace the Aegean tracks left by Antonio Correa Montenegro from Kithera to Kekova Roads, from Crete to Lesbos. While you holiday. That's right, while you have a family or friends holiday aboard a bareboat charter yacht cruising just as did Antonio Correa Montenegro in his bertone or in command of a Hospitaller galley. Enjoying a swimming pleasure he must have enjoyed. Cruising Rhodes and Kastellorizon as he did, and into Greater Cold Water Bay where he left 400,000 Ottoman piasters. Do it aboard a Dufour 325. She can take you to many of the stops along Montenegro's tracks, not to mention Gocek in the Gulf of Makri/Fethiye, home to some of our Dufour 325's. Contact Charter Yachts Turkey today at charter@gocekturkey.com